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African-American Soldiers of the Revolutionary War - from "For Love of Liberty"

African-American Soldiers of the Revolutionary War - from "For Love of Liberty"

Uncover the true story of our nation’s black heroes and patriots that played pivotal roles in the U.S. Military since the earliest days of the republic. From the battle fields of the Revolution to the deserts of Iraq examine why, despite enormous injustice, these heroic men and women fought so valiantly for freedoms they themselves did not enjoy. Through letters, diaries, speeches, journalistic accounts, historical text and military records discover the fierce and faithful history of our African-American military leaders. Honoring African-American Servicemen and women! An excerpt from the film “For Love of Liberty” - Hosted by Halle Berry and featuring the voices of Ossie Davis, Robert Duvall and Morgan Freeman A showcase of our work directing and producing the historical recreations used in the film. For education, entertainment, enlightenment and inspiration. We hope you enjoy and even learn something. Never forget! ** Find All Of Our Exclusive Patriotic & History-Oriented Merchandise Here - Every Sale Supports The Channel And Keeps Us "On The Air": https://teespring.com/stores/lionheart-filmworks PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, CLICK THE 'BELL' ICON FOR ALERTS ON NEW CONTENT - AND SHARE THIS VIDEO TO HELP US GROW AND KEEP HISTORY HAPPENING! http://www.lionheart-filmworks.com/store Some other videos you might like on our Channel: 400 Evolution of the United States Army Uniform: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n3Q6RyDFAJI&t=21s Cpl. Freddie Stowers - 1918 Medal Of Honor Moment: https://youtu.be/tRcy2plxPQs "Civil War Uniforms of Blue & Grey - The Evolution" Volume 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8MAlu2NEps&t=25s U.S. Army Battles & History - World War Two - Heroism & Honor: https://youtu.be/ldnpvOFn7fE Lt. Robert T. Waugh - 1944 Medal Of Honor Moment: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwpJnAfoHCU&t=407s Medal of Honor Moment - Sergeant York: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ad9FWugOIyM ✈️🚁⭐ *** ONE WAY YOU CAN SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL! If you love military history, and to collect and model the great warbirds of the past - please visit our friends at Air Models in the UK - Each purchase really helps this channel out: http://airmodels.net/?aff=60 ***
Black Wall Street - Full Documentary
42:31

Black Wall Street - Full Documentary

The Tulsa race riot was a large-scale, racially motivated pogrom on May 31 and June 1, 1921, in which a group of whites attacked the black community of Tulsa, Oklahoma. The Greenwood District, the wealthiest black community in the United States (now commonly referred to as "the Black Wall Street"), was burned to the ground. Over the course of 16 hours, more than 800 people were admitted to local white hospitals with injuries, the two black hospitals were burned down, and police arrested and detained more than 6,000 black Greenwood residents at three local facilities. An estimated 10,000 blacks were left homeless, and 35 city blocks composed of 1,256 residences were destroyed by fire, resulting in over $26 million in damages. The official count of the dead by the Oklahoma Bureau of Vital Statistics was 36, but other estimates of black fatalities vary from 55 to about 300. The events of the massacre were long omitted from local and state histories: "The Tulsa race riot of 1921 was rarely mentioned in history books, classrooms or even in private. Blacks and whites alike grew into middle age unaware of what had taken place."[1] With the number of survivors declining, in 1996, the state legislature commissioned a report to establish the historical record of the events, and acknowledge the victims and damages to the black community. Released in 2001, the report included the commission's recommendations for some compensatory actions, most of which were not implemented by the state and city governments. The state passed legislation to establish some scholarships for descendants of survivors, economic development of Greenwood, and a memorial park to the victims in Tulsa. The latter was dedicated in 2010.
Black Wall Street~Footage Massacre,Tulsa OK 1921, Historical Black Towns BlackHistoryUniversity.com
14:59

Black Wall Street~Footage Massacre,Tulsa OK 1921, Historical Black Towns BlackHistoryUniversity.com

Solomon Sir Jones (1869-1936) Solomon Sir Jones, Baptist minister, businessman, and amateur filmmaker. Jones became an influential Baptist minister, building and pastoring fifteen churches. He was head of the Boyd Faction of Negro Baptists in America and was a successful businessman. Jones filmed the rebuilding of Black Wall Street after the Tulsa Massacre. Prior to Oklahoma gaining its Statehood, African Americans seeking refuge from Lynchings began establishing over 50 towns and communities in the territories amongst the Native Americans. Ida B.Wells an anti-lynching advocate led an Exodus out of Mississippi and into Oklahoma. In 1905 the Natives proposed to name their Oklahoma “territory”, Sequoyah. Thirteen towns still exist today! Juneteenth is the perfect time to support these historical towns!!! The Coltrane Group, a set of volunteers focused on revitalizing and preserving the black towns of Oklahoma, has worked to bring new life to these 13 communities by holding all-black town tours for the last four years. They are raising money and writing for grants to preserve and revitalize the towns’ most famous buildings. To learn more, call the Coltrane Group at 206-948-8852 or 206-949-5012, or email andreh@thecoltranegroup.org, For more information, visit hbtok.org. Listen to The Gist of Freedom is Still Faith podcast WWW.BlackHistoryUniversity.com --------- It was pure envy, and a vow to put progressive, high achieving African Americans in their place that would cause the demise of the Black Mecca many called “Little Africa”, and its destruction began the way much terrorism, violence, and dispossession against African Americans did during that era. A young White woman accused a young Black man of attempted sexual assault, which gave local mobs and White men acting as police just cause to invade the unsuspecting community.
The lost neighborhood under New York's Central Park
08:16

The lost neighborhood under New York's Central Park

Before Central Park was built, a historic black community was destroyed. Help our reporting on hidden histories. Submit a story idea here: http://bit.ly/2RhjxMy If you’ve been to New York, you’ve probably visited Central Park. But there’s a part of its story you won't see. It’s a story that goes back to the 1820s, when that part of New York was largely open countryside. Soon it became home to about 1,600 people. Among them was a predominantly black community that bought up affordable plots to build homes, churches and a school. It became known as Seneca Village. And when Irish and German immigrants moved in, it became a rare example at the time of an integrated neighborhood. Everything changed on July 21, 1853. New York took control of the land to create what would become the first major landscaped park in the US -- they called it “The Central Park.” In the Vox series Missing Chapter, Vox Senior Producer Ranjani Chakraborty revisits underreported and often overlooked moments from the past to give context to the present. Join her as she covers the histories that are often left out of our textbooks. Our first season tackles stories of racial injustice, political conflicts, even the hidden history of US medical experimentation. Have an idea for a story that Ranjani should investigate for Missing Chapter? Send it to her via this form! http://bit.ly/2RhjxMy Sign up for the Missing Chapter newsletter to stay up to date with the series: https://vox.com/missing-chapter Explore the full Missing Chapter playlist, including episodes, a creator Q&A, and more! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJ8cMiYb3G5fR2kt0L4Nihvel4pEDw9od The Institute for the Exploration of Seneca Village History website: http://projects.mcah.columbia.edu/seneca_village/ The exhibit on Seneca Village through the Central Park Conservancy: https://www.centralparknyc.org/programs/discover-seneca-village Check out the 1856 before and after Central Park plans at the New York Public Library, as well as dozens of other Central Park maps and archives: https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/6850fc74-5e61-8806-e040-e00a18067a2c Read the full report on the 2011 Seneca Village excavations: http://s-media.nyc.gov/agencies/lpc/arch_reports/1828.pdf Read the New York Times’ coverage of Seneca Village: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/28/opinion/seneca-central-park-nyc.html Read The Park and the People by Elizabeth Blackmar and Roy Rosenzweig for a comprehensive history of Central Park, including Seneca Village: https://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/9780801497513/the-park-and-the-people/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Make sure you never miss behind the scenes content in the Vox Video newsletter, sign up here: http://vox.com/video-newsletter Support Vox's reporting with a one-time or recurring contribution: http://vox.com/contribute-now Shop the Vox merch store: http://vox.com/store Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://facebook.com/vox Follow Vox on Twitter: http://twitter.com/voxdotcom Follow Vox on TikTok: http://tiktok.com/@voxdotcom